Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park East

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park East

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Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park (East)

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park Tatungalung Country

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park is one of the jointly managed parks within Gippsland. The Joint Management agreement recognises the fact that the Gunaikurnai people hold Aboriginal Title and maintain a strong connection to Country. As custodians of the land, they are the rightful people who speak for their Country. These parks and reserves are cultural landscapes that continue to be part of Gunaikurnai living culture. For more information on Joint Management, please visit the Gunaikurnai Traditional Owner Land Management Board and the Gunaikurnai Land and Waters Aboriginal Corporation.

Sitting between the lakeside villages of Lakes Entrance and Loch Sport, the east region of Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park is a much-loved destination for year-round aquatic action and relaxation. Spend your days cruising the lakes, strolling the stunning coastline, cooling off in sheltered coves, or watching the sunset from your camping chair.

East of historic Steamer Landing, Bunga Arm is perfect for hiking, swimming, kayaking and waterskiing adventures around the waterways.

Accessible only by boat, Bunga Arm was formed over many thousands of years when sand, deposited by the sea, built up between the original bay (now Lake Victoria) and the ocean. Approximately 250 metres divides the tranquil waters of Bunga Arm from the pounding surf of Bass Strait - and you can stay at one of the seven boat-based bush campsites located there. If you don’t have your own boat to access Bunga Arm, you can hire one at one of the lakeside towns.

Cast a line and try your hand at lake fishing from a boat, bank or jetty. Bream, flathead, skipjack and mullet are common catches.

There are a number of picnic areas on Bunga Arm. Spread your picnic rug at the First Blowhole, or under the shade of old Stone Pines at Ocean Grange. Alternatively, just a short cruise from Lakes Entrance and set opposite Rigby Island, Entrance Bay offers a scenic picnic spot and views over Ninety Mile Beach and the Southern Ocean. Some of the old construction equipment from the 1880s can still be seen here.

Animal lovers are in for a treat with frolicking seals and pods of the rare Burrunan dolphin, which is found only here and in Port Phillip. There’s plenty of native birds, and possible sightings of rare shorebirds including the Little Tern, Fairy Tern and Hooded Plover.

If you get a chance, check out nearby Raymond Island to spot Victoria's largest koala population snoozing in the treetops. If you don't have access to a boat, jump on a free ferry from Paynesville and explore the island's Koala Trail by bike or foot.

The Lakes National Park makes for another peaceful and wildlife-filled retreat from Loch Sport or via boat from Paynesville. Home to more than 190 species of birds including the rare White-bellied Sea-Eagle and the endangered Little Tern, you'll also see Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Swamp Wallabies, echidnas and wombats.

Things to do in the area

Australia’s southern coast is unique. There is no other east-west expanse of temperate shoreline in the southern hemisphere. Some of Victoria’s marine species, such as the eastern blue groper, occur nowhere else in the world.

Little Tern & Fairy Tern
Threatened species that breed on the beaches, mud and sand islands of the Gippsland Lakes area. Littler Terns migrate from southern Queensland and parts of New South Wales to the lakes in early November and stay until about March. Please help these birds by avoiding the sand bars on the islands and keeping your dogs away.

Burrunan Dolphins
The lakes are home to about 50 of the recently described species of bottlenose dolphin, the Burrunan dolphin (Tursiops australis). The other 150 or so of this rare species are to be found in Port Phillip

 

 

A woman enjoys a cup of tea while sat at a picnic table infront of her tent at Bunga Arm Campsite in the Gippsland Lakes.

Bunga Arm

Accessible only by boat, Bunga Arm was formed over many thousands of years when sand, deposited by the sea, built up between the original bay (now Lake Victoria) and the ocean. Approximately 250 metres divides the tranquil waters of Bunga Arm from the pounding surf of Bass Strait - and you can stay at one of the seven boat-based bush campsites located there. If you don’t have your own boat to access Bunga Arm, you can hire one at one of the lakeside towns.
Mum helps her young son as he jumps off a large piece of drift wood at West Cape Beach.

Beaches

Walk white sandy beaches, swim in cool coastal waters or surf the wild waves of the Southern Ocean.
Father and son bird watching on boardwalk

Bird watching

From bushland to wetlands and everything in between, parks provide habitat to an abundance of common and rare bird species. Go for a wander and see how many you can spot.
Two teenage girls take part in a sailing race on Port Philip Bay in a small boat called Inkspot.

Boating and sailing

Take to the waves of Port Phillip and see Victoria's coast from the water or sail inland lakes and rivers by boat or charter.

How to get there

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park (East)

Boat ramps in the east region can be found at Wattle Point, Paynesville, Metung, Nungurner, Loch Sport and Lakes Entrance.

Jetties are also available at Barrier Landing, Drews Jetty, Ocean Grange, Silver Shot Landing and Steamer Landing.

If you're going past Lakes Entrance, stop off at Nyerimilang Heritage Park en route for a picnic or walk. Boasting magnificent views and a rich variety of plant and birdlife, don't miss the homestead set in a delightful garden on a clifftop above the beautiful Gippsland Lakes.

When to go

As the temperature warms up, dive in and enjoy the wide range of water sports available on the Gippsland Lakes. Canoe, kayak, boat or sail through the crystal-clear water. The beaches off Lakes Entrance, Metung and Paynesville are perfect swimming spots for families.

Nearby Events

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Need to know

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park (East)

Change of Conditions

Nature being nature, sometimes conditions can change at short notice. It’s a good idea to check this page ahead of your visit for any updates.

  • Notices Affecting Multiple Parks

    Seasonal road closures 2020

    Some roads in this park are subject to seasonal road closures. Seasonal road closures generally operate after the long weekend in June through to the end of October, but may be extended due to seasonal conditions. View the list of 2020 seasonal road closures for details and check the corresponding map numbers with the seasonal road closure 2020 index map for locations of the closures or visit the seasonal road closures page for more information.

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