Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Kurth Kiln Regional Park

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Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Kurth Kiln Regional Park is part of an Aboriginal cultural landscape that includes the traditional Country of the the Wurundjeri Peoples. Parks Victoria respects the deep and continuing connection that Traditional Owners have to these lands and waters, and we recognise their ongoing role in caring for Country.

Escape the hustle and bustle at Kurth Kiln Regional Park located a short distance east of Melbourne. One of the closest bush camping opportunities to urban Melbourne, the park really is a breath of fresh air. Bring your dog, on a leash, and set up at one of the many free bush camping sites located in the park. There are tracks suitable for horse riding along with designated areas where horses can be loaded/unloaded safely.

Explore the park on foot or mountain bike ride discovering creeks, the historic huts and caretaker residence and Shiprock Falls.

The park's namesake Kurth Kiln was built in the second world war to make charcoal, developed and patented by Professor E. E. Kurth of the University of Tasmania. The charcoal was used in gas producer units attached to motor vehicles to produce combustible gas as an alternative to petrol during the Second World War.

In the late 1940s the Forests Commission bought 18 huts from the army and set them up beside Kurth Kiln to accommodate returned servicemen working in the forestry industry. Four of these huts remain along with the tall kiln and its iron chimney. It is a rare example of a relatively intact charcoal burning kiln and the only one of its type in Australia.

Rich in flora, the park is an oasis for rare plants including Long Pink-bells, Tall Astelia and Brickmakers Saw-sedge along with stunning Mountain Ash, stringybark and riparian forests.

With such a diverse plant life there is the welcomed attraction of many animals. Keep your eyes peeled for the many small and very active birds, the elusive swamp wallabies, inquisitive lace monitors and prickly echidnas during the day. At night you might hear or see koalas, yellow-bellied gliders, sugar gliders, greater gliders and large forest owls.

Things To Do

 
Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Camping

Camping is popular at both the Scout Loop and Magazine Camping Areas (east of the picnic ground and kiln). The camping areas offer convenient access to 36 designated sites in attractive natural settings with bush toilet facilities. There is also a communal camping area at Heritage Fence Camping Area. Campers are encouraged to bring their own firewood. Unload your horse at the Scout Loop camping area and set of on one of the many trails suitable for horse riding. There is also a small horse corral located in this area.
Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Heritage buildings

Visit the park's many heritage buildings - the park's namesake Kurth Kiln was built in the second world war to make charcoal which was then used in gas producer units attached to motor vehicles to produce combustible gas as an alternative to petrol during the Second World War. Four huts out of 18 purchased in the late 1940s by the the Forests Commission for returned servicemen also remain, along with the tall kiln and its iron chimney.
Family picnicking on the grass with trees in the background

Picnicking

There are several picnic grounds with fire places, toilets and tables for you to enjoy a moment in nature. Refer to park map for ideal locations. There is a large picnic area adjacent to the Kiln where there are several information boards to learn about the history of the park.
Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Walking

One of the best ways to explore the park is on foot. Strap on those walking boots, dress appropriately for the weather, carry some provisions and a good map and get out into the natural world. Kurth Kiln Regional Park is a great place for walking. There are many kilometres of tracks ranging from gentle circuits through to the more advanced, extended trails which can take you to the nearby Bunyip State Park and back.
Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Unique flora and fauna

The park has several plant communities ranging from Mountain Ash and riparian forests to shrubby foothill forest and swampy heathland. These support a rich flora and contain the rare plants Long Pink‐bells, Tall Astelia, Jungle Bristle‐fern and Brickmakers Saw‐sedge. Calling the park home are a large range of wildlife including wombats, swamp wallabies and echidnas. There is also a diverse mammal population, active mostly at night. They include brushtail and ringtail possums, yellowbellied gliders, sugar gliders and greater gliders. Bush rats and antechinus may be spotted scuttling around on the forest floor. Birdlife is active. Lookout for lyrebirds, honeyeaters, kookaburras, parrots, Yellow‐tailed Black Cockatoos, currawongs and butcherbirds.

Kurth Kiln Regional Park

This area is well known for its wildlife. Keep an eye out for:

Lace monitors
Koalas
Wombats
Powerful owls
Eastern Pygmy Possums
Echidnas
Platypus
Lyrebirds
Wallabies
Crimson Rosella
Antechinus
Wedge-tailed eagles

Tours and adventure experiences in parks

One of the best ways you can get into nature is with a Licensed Tour Operator.

There are more than 400 Licensed Tour Operators across Victoria who are ready and waiting to help you experience and connect with Victoria’s spectacular parks and waterways.

Discover more than 60 different types of nature-based experiences including hiking, mountain biking, boating, four-wheel driving, indigenous culture tours, birdwatching, surfing, diving and so much more. 

Licensed Tour Operators know the all best places to go and will plan and prepare your visit to ensure you are safe and can enjoy your nature-based adventure to the fullest.

Find a Licensed Tour Operator

How to get there

Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Kurth Kiln Regional Park is 65km east of Melbourne. Get there via Launching Place Road or Beenak Road, Gembrook. Kurth Kiln Picnic Ground and Camping Area is seven kilometres north of Gembrook.

When to go

A cool place to escape the city heat shaded by a dry sclerophyll mixed species forest of Messmate Stringybark, Yellow Box, Narrow-leaved Peppermint and Silvertop Ash.

Need to know

Kurth Kiln Regional Park

Change of Conditions

Nature being nature, sometimes conditions can change at short notice. It’s a good idea to check this page ahead of your visit for any updates.

  • Notices Affecting Multiple Parks

    Ash Landing Road Closed (Bunyip State Park)

    Ash Landing Road will be closed at the intersection of Black Snake Creek Road and the intersection of Beenak Road until such time as the surface conditions of this road are no longer hazardous to traffic.  Surface conditions will be monitored on a weekly basis.
    We apologise for any inconvenience and thankyou for your understanding.
    Kind Regards,
    Park Management

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