Waterfalls

Walking

Whale Watching

Wonderful winter experiences

Think the outdoors aren’t the place to be in winter? Think again! Rainforests may be better in winter, but that means it's a great time to see waterfalls flowing. Visit the coast in winter and you might be lucky to spot a whale. Or just rug up and get together with friends for a brisk walk.

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Waterfalls

With increased rainfall, winter is a great time to see waterfalls flowing. Many are only a short walk from the carpark, so you don’t need to spend too long in the cold to experience glorious nature! Remember, waterfalls may seem like an inviting place to take a dip, but swimming can be dangerous. There’s plenty of other ways to enjoy the beauty of waterfalls. They make for a spectacular end to a nature walk, with the opportunity to take great photos for your efforts.

Find your next waterfall adventure on by visiting our waterfalls page.



Popular waterfalls:

A young couple cross the stream on rocks in front a the spectacular MacKenzies Falls.

MacKenzie Falls

An easy stroll from the MackKenzie Falls carpark leads to a viewing platform overlooking the picturesque Broken Falls. To reach the base of MacKenzie Falls, follow the signs. Take care as this walk has many steps and is steep, slippery and strenuous in sections.
A husband and wife stop to take a photo of Masons Falls from the lookout.

Masons Falls

Enjoy a picnic in the beautiful surrounds of Masons Falls Picnic Area. Set among towering gums, the large shelters and free gas barbecues make it the perfect place for a social gathering. The short waterfall walk is a real highlight.
Three friends standing at the Erskine Falls lookout admiring the waterfall.

Erskine Falls

Erskine Falls are at the end of Erskine Falls Road 10km north west of Lorne. There is a viewing point above the falls and a walking track, steep in places, leads to the base of the falls. The falls cascade over one of the highest drops in the Otways.
A couple stand and admire Sheoak Falls near Lorne in the Great Otway National Park.

Sheoak Falls

The Sheoak Falls Walk weaves its way from the coastal woodland at the mouth of the Sheoak Creek and through wet forest to the hidden cascades of Sheoak Falls.
Four friends relax by the edge of the Yarra River as their curly brown dog gets ready to jump in the water.

Dights Falls

The park's best known geological feature is Dights Falls. Dights Falls is an artificial weir built on a natural rock bar across the Yarra. The weir was built in the 1840s to provide water to the 'Ceres' flour mill, one of the first in Victoria
Water cascades over Olinda Falls

Olinda-Falls

Starting at the Olinda Falls Picnic Ground, follow the Falls Track. After 300m, you will come to the top viewing platform across Olinda Creek as the steady flow of water cascades over the rocks. A further 140m leads to the lower viewing platform and a small bridge over the creek.
Sherbrooke Falls in the Dandenong Ranges National Park.

Sherbrooke Falls

Tracks leading from Sherbrooke and O’Donohue Picnic Ground provide the easiest walk to the falls through the attractive landscape of tall Mountain Ash and tree ferns. The falls are most inspiring after rain when the swollen Sherbrooke Creek rushes over the rocks.

Whale watching

Don’t avoid the coast in winter, you might miss the chance to spot a whale! You’ve got a chance to spot whales all along the Great Ocean Road from May to October. Keep your eyes peeled for Southern Right Whales at Cape Nelson Lighthouse Reserve, Bay of Islands Coastal Park, Belfast Coastal Reserve or Port Campbell National Park.

Joining a licensed tour operator is a great way to discover amazing ocean wildlife.



More places where you can spot whales:

A mother, father and their two young daughts gaze out at the sea from the lookout point of the lighthouse.

Point Hicks Lighthouse

Situated deep within Croajingolong National Park, the Point Hicks Lighthouse now offers a unique holiday experience for those who want to stay in one of the keepers cottages, which are now comfortable, self-contained holiday accommodation.
A rock formation near the waters edge at Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary

Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary

Located near the mouth of the Barwon River, Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary protects 17 hectares of reef and sea life. Featuring a diversity of habitats in a small area, it makes an excellent spot for learning about local marine life by exploring the rock platforms and beaches on an organised or self-guided tour.
View of the coastline from Punchbowl Look Yallock Bulluk Marine and Coastal Park

Yallock-Bulluk Marine and Coastal Park

Stretching along the Bass Coast from San Remo to Inverloch, Yallock-Bulluk Marine and Coastal Park is a varied landscape of dramatic cliffs, sandy coves, wetlands, and underwater reefs that are home to unique flora and fauna. This area is the traditional land and hunting grounds of the Bunurong people.

Walking

If you ask us, there's something special about rugging up and taking a walk in the cooler weather — especially if it's not raining! Walking in nature benefits your mental health and wellbeing all year round. Plus, it’s a great way to socialise. Get your friends together for a brisk winter walk or join one of our guided park walks to meet new people. Just remember to take a waterproof jacket and some extra warm clothes.

Get inspired on our walking



Popular places for a walk:

A couple look out over the water from the beach at Lysterfield Lake.

Lysterfield Park

Rising from the southern foothills of the Dandenong Ranges, Lysterfield Park is the perfect place to explore nature with friends with a huge variety of recreational activities.
A family share a picnic while a father and son play with a model aircraft in the background.

Jells Park

Jells Park is nestled in the Dandenong Creek Valley, Wheelers Hill, away from the hustle and bustle of urban life. The park attracts over 900,000 visitors a year, with over nine kilometres of paths and trails, 127 hectares of wide open spaces and enough picnic areas for everyone to enjoy.
Two women in activewear walk their dogs while two runners approach them.

Albert Park

Jog, cycle or walk with your dog around Albert Park Lake - just 3km from the centre of Melbourne. And when you stop to catch your breath, take a moment to enjoy the magnificent views of the city skyline.
Donellys Weir in the Yarra Ranges National Park.

Yarra Ranges National Park

Situated between Melbourne and the Victorian Alps, the Yarra Ranges National Park is a place of epic views, majestic rainforest scenery and fun-packed snowplay. Enjoy the panorama from Mount Donna Buang, or go deeper into the park on the Black Spur Drive, and wind through towering Mountain Ash forests to Lake Mountain.
Two women in active wear walk up the granite steps on the way to Flinders Peak.

You Yangs Regional Park

Magnificent views, birdlife and a mecca for walkers, horse riders and mountain bikers - welcome to the You Yangs! The distinctive granite peaks of this park rise abruptly from the flat plains below. Flinders Peak and Big Rock have panoramic views out to Melbourne, which is just an hour away.
The view of Safety Beach and Port Phillip from the top of Arthurs Seat State Park.

Arthurs Seat State Park

Rising above the Mornington Peninsula, Arthurs Seat State Park is a prominent feature in the landscape of Port Philip Bay.
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